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The Tea

This work by Mary Cassatt dates back to about 1880 and is kept at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. As it often happens in the paintings of the American artist, this painting shows some moments of social interaction of wealthy women like her. Her aversion to narration and her devotion to superficial disposition and colour are evident: these elements mark her dedication to the most advanced artistic principles of her time. The depicted moment is daily routine: teatime
€150.00
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P-287

Data sheet

Dimensions
cm. 60x90
1 - Characteristics and Properties
Fir wood frame with rounded edges of cm. 3.0 thickness
2 - Characteristics and Properties
Ready to hang
3 - Characteristics and Properties
Edges are finished on the sides
4 - Characteristics and Properties
Full HD print on washable, UV-resistant canvas
Remarks
Imported product
This work by Mary Cassatt dates back to about 1880 and is kept at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. As it often happens in the paintings of the American artist, this painting shows some moments of social interaction of wealthy women like her. Her aversion to narration and her devotion to superficial disposition and colour are evident: these elements mark her dedication to the most advanced artistic principles of her time. The depicted moment is daily routine: teatime. The painting is set in a living room like her own, striped wallpaper is refined, like the carved marble fireplace decorated with a framed picture and a porcelain vase. The landlady is often identified as her sister, Lydia, and the guest as a family friend, but maybe the two women were the usual models of the painter, a brunette and a blonde. Despite these conservative and tasteful environments, Cassatt's painting is a declaration of modernity that demonstrates her rejection of different traditional artistic conventions: the artist hides the face of the subject portraying her when she is sipping tea and her face is hidden by the cup. In the first place there is the tea service, not the two women. The pictorial idea of giving the inanimate objects the same priority as the figures was sometimes employed by her friend Edgar Degas, who in 1877 invited her to join a group of independent artists, later known as Impressionists. “I accepted with joy”, she later recalled. “I hated conventional art”. She was one of the few women and the only American to perform with the group.

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